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Photographer Profile: Jesse Sewell Sparks Jr

Photographer Profile: Jesse Sewell Sparks Jr
The Grand Canyon, Lipan Point. Because of total darkness, there was no way to focus on the distance to the point being struck by lightning. I had to turn off auto-focus and dial in what I figured was the proper setting. Canon 6D with Canon EF 24-105mm 1:4 IS UM. Exposure: f/6.3 6sec ISO 320.

Photographer: Jesse Sewell Sparks Jr

Amateur Photographer

Photographic Specialties:

  • Landscape
  • Wildlife
  • Travel
  • Events
  • Macro
  • Other

Biography

When I was younger, I was a good photographer, but work and family took me away from my passion. When I retired seven years ago, I decided to enter the digital age of photography. As a trained observer, I tend to see things differently than most and have an eye for good subject matter. When I take my pictures, I try and capture just what I see that I think others will enjoy. I don’t manipulate my images, other than cropping them, in any way that would change that which was caught by my camera. To accomplish this, I tweak the camera settings and not the photo. All my best to all.

Photographer Profile: Jesse Sewell Sparks Jr
Hwy 95 just North of Tonopah, NV. Canon 6D with Canon EF 24-105mm 1:4 IS UM. Exposure: f/8, 1/250 sec., ISO 100.
Photographer Profile: Jesse Sewell Sparks Jr
San Miguel, California. The only challenge this picture posed was keeping my hands steady in cold weather. Canon 6D with Canon EF 24-105mm 1:4 IS UM. Exposure: f/4 1/60 sec ISO 100.
Photographer Profile: Jesse Sewell Sparks Jr
Las Vegas, NV. Challenge: Steady hands. Canon EOS Rebel T2i with a Tamron SP AF200-500mm F/5-6.3. Exposure: f/5 1250 sec ISO 320.
Photographer Profile: Jesse Sewell Sparks Jr
North of Ojai, California. Canon T2i. Exposure: f/5.6 1.6sec ISO 3200.
Las Vegas, NV. Canon 6D with Canon EF 24-105mm 1:4 IS UM and a Lighting Bug. Exposure: f/4.5, 1/50sec., ISO 1250.

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Photographer Profile: Jesse Sewell Sparks Jr

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Photographer Profile: Robert D Varley

Photographer Profile: Robert D Varley
The Great Sand Dunes National Park in Colorado. I shot this scene early in the morning to capture the long shadows on the Dunes. Nikon D810, Tamron 150-600mm, Giottos tripod. Exposure: 1/25, f14, ISO 200, 380mm.

Photographer: Robert D Varley

Part-Time Professional Photographer

Photographic Specialties:

  • Landscape
  • Wildlife
  • Architecture / Real Estate

Biography

Rob studied photography at East Texas State University in the 70s. He perfected his photo skills during his 35+ years in destination marketing business, using his images to promote the various destinations he represented from Texas to California to Florida. Rob concentrated his photography on landscape, wildlife, and architecture. “There is incredible beauty to be found in every destination if you open your eyes and look around. discovering an interesting scene and being able to share that moment with others is what photography is all about for me.”

Website

www.rvarleygallery.smugmug.com

Social

Facebook

Photographer Profile: Robert D Varley
Viera, Florida. I captured this guy in a field of grass. I wanted to get his profile in a narrow depth of field. I shot this through my truck window, bracing the lens on the door window. Nikon D810, Tamron 150-600mm. Exposure: Nikon D810, Tamron 150-600mm.
Photographer Profile: Robert D Varley
Page, Arizona. You have to go with a Navajo guide through the Antelope Canyon and are with a group of 12. I had to make sure I was able to find a good spot to capture the entrance into the Great Hall and set up quickly. You carry your camera in attached to your tripod, with the legs out and you can’t change your lens once in the canyon because of the sand. Exposure: 1.3, f16, ISO 200, 20mm.
Photographer Profile: Robert D Varley
Antelope Canyon in Page, AR. The challenge on this capture was crawling on my knees to get the angle I wanted. Sony a850, Minolta/Sony 18-70 mm, Slid 400XD tripod. Exposure: 1/6, f16, ISO 200, 20mm.
Photographer Profile: Robert D Varley
St Johns River near Titusville, FL. It was a foggy morning and I came into the Cypress cove on an airboat. We got onto a small strip of land across from the scene. I wanted to capture the symmetry of the tree line and reflections of the trees and the Sun peeking through the fog. As I was shooting, the white Heron landed and stepped in front of the Cypress. A fish splashed in the water, giving me the small circle of ripples in the water. One of those moments of being in the right place at the right time. Sony a850, Zeiss 16-35mm, Slik Pro 400DX tripod. Exposure: 1/90 f8 200 ISO 35mm.
Photographer Profile: Robert D Varley
Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Nikon D810, Nikon 28-300mm. Exposure: 1/100, f14, ISO 800, 28mm.

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Photographer Profile: Robert D Varley

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Photographer Profile: Barbara J Gilbert

Photographer Profile: Barbara J Gilbert
Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. Nikon D5300 w Tamron 16-300mm lens. Exposure: 1/640 @ F/11.

Photographer: Barbara J Gilbert

Amateur Photographer

Photographic Specialties:

  • Landscape
  • Wildlife
  • Travel
  • Portraiture
  • Macro
  • Architecture / Real Estate
  • Other

Biography

I am a disabled veteran who has taken up photography as a hobby. The types of pictures I like to take are of landscapes and wildlife the most; historical buildings and other old structures and equipment catch my eye as well. Close-up photography is a favorite of mine. It gives you so much detail about the subject, and you can see the vibrant colors so much better close up. The more I learn about photography, the more I branch out and take pictures of subjects other than what I am comfortable with.

Website

www.gilbertsamateurphotography.com

Social

Facebook

Instagram

Flickr

Photographer Profile: Barbara J Gilbert
Chincoteague Island. Nikon D5300 with Tamron 16-300mm lens. Exposure: 1/125 @ f/8.
Photographer Profile: Barbara J Gilbert
Miles River, Easton Maryland. Nikon D5300 with Tamron 16-300mm lens. Exposure: 1/1600 sec @ f7.1.
Photographer Profile: Barbara J Gilbert
Easton, MD. Nikon Coolpix P900. Exposure: 1/1000 @ F/4.
Photographer Profile: Barbara J Gilbert
Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. Nikon D5300 w 16-300mm lens. Exposure: 1/125 @ F/14.
Photographer Profile: Barbara J Gilbert
Salisbury Zoo, Salisbury Maryland. Exposure: 1/800 @ F/11.

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Photographer Profile: Barbara J Gilbert

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Photo Of The Day By Gerry Groeber

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Desert Nights” by Gerry Groeber. Location: Superstition Wilderness, Arizona.
Photo By Gerry Groeber

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Desert Nights” by Gerry Groeber. Location: Superstition Wilderness, Arizona.

“The desert at night is very special,”  says Groeber. “This time of year, cool air will blow across the desert floor sometimes with a 5-10 degree temperature change. It’s quiet and you can hear animals off in the distance. There is beauty in silence.”

See more of Gerry Groeber’s photography at www.gerrygroeber.com.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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Source: Outdoor Photography
Photo Of The Day By Gerry Groeber

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Beautiful Oddities Of Joshua Tree

Joshua Tree silhouette
The silhouette of a Joshua tree in Hidden Valley. The orange glow is the result of light pollution from cities to the south.

Desert habitats are ecological peculiarities. They are harsh environments, typically with sand and rock instead of rich soil and running water. Their evaporation rates tend to exceed precipitation rates. And even though desert habitats can harbor a surprising diversity of life, their harsh conditions do not favor abundance. Instead, the plants and animals that live there have special adaptations to deal with the harsh conditions, such as extreme heat, cold and lack of water for long periods of time. But then there is Joshua Tree National Park. Joshua Tree is a landscape distinguishable from all its desert counterparts, complete with its own characteristics and eccentricities, and at its heart is the odd tree that gave the park its name.

The Joshua tree looks like no other tree in the world, and it is, in fact, not really a tree. It’s a tree-like succulent that is actually a member of the agave family. Their age is challenging to estimate, as their trunks are filled with fibers and lack the growth rings found in typical trees. Their large, soccer ball-size flower, with its cream-colored petals, acts as a nursery to the yucca moth, the tree’s primary pollinator. The Joshua tree looks, well, odd. Simply put, the Joshua tree is a malformed peculiarity with gangly and misshapen branches that seem to point in a direction with no discernible path. As beautifully odd as the tree is, it is also tremendously fun to photograph.

Also framing this national park’s landscape are large monzogranite boulders, called white tank boulders. White tank boulders are the result of ancient geologic processes involving two tectonic plates (the Farrallon and Continental plates) well over 100 million years ago. The boulders can be found in all kinds of shapes, sizes and patterns, and they make for a beautiful subject or picturesque backdrop. The famous Arch Rock and Giant Marbles are remarkable examples of this geology and make for brilliant photographic subjects.

All of Joshua Tree National Park’s beautiful oddities taken together — the prehistoric rock, the gangly trees, the desert floor laced with succulents and woody shrubs, the shy but pervasive wildlife — are precisely what makes the place interesting and appealing. So how does one translate all this photographically?

Joshua Tree star trails
Polaris (the north star) acts as a stunning backdrop to the famous Arch Rock. This is one exposure created by opening the shutter for 40 minutes.

To start, I suggest bringing your full arsenal of modern and eccentric photo techniques, such as night photography, time lapse, long exposures, light painting, HDR, pano-stitching or whatever your creative mind can come up with. In Joshua Tree, they can all be useful as you play with new compositions and find new perspectives to convey the essence and nature of this odd, grand, peculiar and beautiful place.

Joshua Tree: North Versus South

Joshua Tree is comprised of two separate desert ecozones: the Mojave Desert and the Colorado Desert. The Colorado Desert, which is in fact a western extension of the Sonoran Desert, occupies the southern and eastern portions of the park and is typically drier than its counterpart. The Mojave Desert occupies the western side of the park, is higher in elevation, and is moister than the Colorado.

Virtually all of the Joshua trees in the park are found in the Mojave Desert region, along with most of the interesting geologic formations. Considering this, I spend almost all my time shooting in the Mojave portion of the park. It just has more of what one would expect when visiting Joshua Tree.

The Colorado Desert is home to the dangerous but beautiful cholla cactus along with the tall and lithe ocotillo, but do be careful around cholla. Pieces of it can jump off and stick to almost anything that ever so slightly brushes up against it, which is why it’s also called “jumping” cholla. Ocotillos are beautiful and tall succulents that can grow more than 30 feet tall. They have individual stems growing mostly straight up, with the stems of the taller, more mature plants moving in twisty and distorted directions. In the spring, their stems are topped with wonderful, bright red zygomorphic flowers. And when the wind isn’t blowing, they make for great nighttime subjects.

Cholla cactus at Joshua Tree
“Jumping” cholla cactus are dangerous but beautiful. Photographed in the Cholla Cactus Garden.

Night Photography At Joshua Tree

Each year in the spring, I teach a workshop in Joshua Tree and have done so for many years. The workshop’s focus is on night photography, covering basic techniques in light painting and photographing stars. Joshua Tree is wonderful at night, and one of the reasons I keep coming back is that photographers can be productive in Joshua Tree at night, even if the conditions are less than stellar—pun most certainly intended.

And for yet another oddity about Joshua Tree: There is a lot of light pollution bleeding in from Palm Springs and Rancho Mirage to the south that, for me, works well for shooting at night. Typically, such amber-colored city lights are an unnatural, and, thus, mostly unwanted distraction for the outdoor photographic purist. But because what we see in Joshua Tree is so otherworldly, the odd color light, for me, adds a layer of color that is attractive and interesting. Furthermore, when clouds come in obscuring the view of the stars, the pollution acts as an edge light to the clouds. So even if stars become minimized or no longer possible to capture, I suggest to not pack your camera bags, but instead keep shooting and playing with what the sky is offering. You will not be sorry.

Regardless of weather, shooting at night is one of my favorite things to do in Joshua Tree. Night photography is great way to portray something with a different perspective and thus works well in translating the park’s unique character.

Lighting things at night is different. We can use flash, or we can use a flashlight to “paint” light on our subjects during long exposures. Light painting offers us an extraordinary amount of control to show the shapes, textures and patterns of what we’re shooting much more effectively than if we were restricted to just daylight. For light painting, I suggest bringing with you a few kinds of flashlights. My favorite light to bring is a small MagLite with an incandescent bulb. But I also bring a couple LED lights with different color temperatures. LEDs tend be more blue in color than incandescent bulbs, and different color temperatures work differently with different subjects. Experimentation is in order here, but it’s a great idea to have different kinds of flashlights. Of course, if you want to get crazy creative, you can bring anything that lights up, like a rope light, light sabers, Christmas tree lights, key chain lights on strings to spin around while your shutter is open, or anything your mind can come up with.

Ocotillos at Joshua Tree
Ocotillo succulents are tall and spindly and topped with bright red zygomorphic flowers. Ocotillos make for great subjects any time of day.

Shooting The Stars

In general, there are two approaches to shooting stars: You can either have stars trailing through your composition or appear as individual dots in the sky. Either approach requires a wide-angle lens — stars will trail through a frame faster with telephoto lenses rather than wide-angle lenses.

I suggest the “less than 30, more than 30” guide. To get the stars-are-still look, try keeping your shutter speed between 20 and 30 seconds. Other settings vary a bit, but I’m usually somewhere between ƒ/4 and ƒ/5.6 (and rarely ƒ/8), with an ISO setting between 1000 and 2000. Either way, the 30-second limit is key. Anything more than that tends to show noticeable movement in the stars. The stars end up looking either blurry or like an unsuccessful attempt made at a shot where the intention was moving stars.

If you want nice, long trailing stars that sweep through your background, anything less than 30 minutes creates short-in-length lines that feel like a longer exposure would’ve been better. I like 40 minutes to an hour, but I’m admittedly not always that patient. With longer exposures, I would suggest starting with settings less likely to result in noise. Try 800 to 1600 ISO, and an aperture of ƒ/5.6 to ƒ/8.

The brightness of your camera’s LED screen can be quite deceiving. At night, it looks much brighter than normal, so don’t trust that your RAW file is exposed well. Be sure to double-check your histogram to make sure you are where you need to be.

Opening a shutter for more than 30 minutes is not easy or possible for a lot of cameras. Many cameras will create extremely noisy and even unacceptable images when shooting for that long. Another approach to minimize this problem is to take many pictures as if you were creating a time-lapse sequence and then blend, or “stack,” the images using software.

Jumbo Rocks at Joshua Tree
This Joshua tree was shot in the Jumbo Rocks campground and was created using the light of our campfire over a 20-second exposure.

To create an image of the Milky Way, try the 30-seconds-or-less approach. Keep in mind that in order to create images with that crisp and colorful Milky Way look, some developing in Lightroom or ACR is a must. Contrast and Clarity sliders can do wonders for bringing it all out.

Photoshop is the tool most often used (I think), but Photoshop can be tricky — and, if you’re not adept at using it, very time consuming. So, before attempting to shoot stars and play with Photoshop in this regard, first try a Google search for “star stacking Photoshop.” There are many videos and articles to choose from to see how it’s done. There are also Photoshop actions that are pre-made and you can download for free (a “donation” may be requested in exchange). Try Googling “star stacking Photoshop action” to find a couple of those. Outside of Photoshop, StarStaX is popular stacking program with photographers and easy to use. Be aware, one of the issues with stacking stars is gaps are left in between frames. The result is star trails that look perforated, so be sure to look for “gap-filling” features and tutorials. It’s a great feature.

Joshua Tree’s “Must Do” List And Where To Go

The best of what’s in Joshua Tree is most easily accessible from the north side of the park. I suggest entering the park from either the north entrance accessible from Twentynine Palms, or you can enter from the west entrance through the town of Joshua Tree Village. All of the Joshua trees and interesting granite rocks are found in the north, along with most of the campgrounds. And if you are interested in lodging, it’s all at the north end. My favorite place to stay is the 29 Palms Inn in Twentynine Palms. It’s a really nice, affordable resort, and on site is the best restaurant in town. Eat there whether you are staying at the inn or not. It doesn’t disappoint.

Of all the places to shoot in the park, I love Hidden Valley the most. It has everything and is not far from the Joshua Tree Village entrance off of Park Boulevard. Note that Hidden Valley has two parts. There are Hidden Valley campground and the day use area. I actually love the day use area. While both are lovely, I suggest driving to the end of the parking lot in the day use area and walking into the large Joshua tree-filled valley. The valley is wide open, picturesque with an endless amount of Joshua trees framing white tank boulders. Getting lost for hours at night in Hidden Valley is something I’ve done more than once. We spend a good amount of time there during my annual workshop, and it never disappoints. Of course, you should not miss Arch Rock, the Ocotillo Patch, Cholla Cactus Garden, Skull Rock or the “Giant Marbles” found inside the Jumbo Rocks campground — all are “must see.”

Yucca plant at Joshua Tree
A yucca plant shot at night with overcast conditions reflects the warm glow from Palm Springs and Rancho Mirage to the south. Behind the yucca is an LED light, and the front was painted with an incandescent light.

Regardless of place, regardless of subject and especially regardless of any preconceived ideas about shots you might have, Joshua Tree is best approached with a sense play and creativity. Photographing Joshua Tree is in part about the trees, the rocks, the plants and animals. But more than that — and it won’t take you long to experience it — Joshua Tree is about shapes and patterns, colors and light, textures and tonality. There are endless compositions to be had here, and the more you experiment playfully with a wide array of modern technique, the sooner you’ll be able to lure out images that effectively translate something beautifully odd.

Maps And More Info For Visiting Joshua Tree

To find almost anything you need in Joshua Tree, visit the National Park Service website to find interactive maps of the park, a list of campground maps, backcountry road maps, simplified trail maps, rock climbing maps, topographic maps and more.

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Beautiful Oddities Of Joshua Tree

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Photographer Profile: Michael Peter Vervier

Photographer Profile: Michael Peter Vervier
Cape May, NJ. Sony Alpha 7 with a Sony 24 – 240 mm lens. Exposure: 1/3200 sec, f/8.0, ISO 800.

Photographer: Michael Peter Vervier

Amateur Photographer

Photographic Specialties:

  • Landscape
  • Wildlife
  • Events

Biography

I am an amateur photographer living in Western Pennsylvania.

Website

mpvervier.myportfolio.com

www.facebook.com/mpvervier

Photographer Profile: Michael Peter Vervier
Pittsburgh, PA. Sony Alpha 7 with a Sony 24 – 240 mm lens. Exposure: 59.0 sec, f/8.0, ISO 100.
Photographer Profile: Michael Peter Vervier
Ocean City, MD. Sony NEX-7 with Sony 55 -210 mm lens. Exposure: 1/200 sec, f/7.1, ISO 100.
Photographer Profile: Michael Peter Vervier
Butler, PA. Sony Alpha 7 with a Tamron 150 – 600 mm lens. 1/50 sec, f/8.0, ISO 1600.
Photographer Profile: Michael Peter Vervier
Ohio River, Cincinnati, OH. Exposure: 1/40 sec., f/8.0, ISO 6400.

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Photographer Profile: Michael Peter Vervier

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Scale Assignment Winner Michael Perea

Congratulations to Michael Perea for winning the recent Scale Assignment with his image, “Coal Mine Canyon Sunrise.”
Photo By Michael Perea

Congratulations to Michael Perea for winning the recent Scale Assignment with his image, “Coal Mine Canyon Sunrise.”

“This shot was taken on the Navajo Indian Reservation in Northern Arizona in a place called Coal Mine Canyon,” explains Perea. “It’s a well-known place in the Arizona photography community, but it’s unknown to most tourists. It’s just a short distance from the famous Monument Valley, Antelope Canyon and the Grand Canyon.

“I was set up well before blue hour, and the entire canyon was well lit because of the full moon. I used a wireless shutter release and as the sun broke the horizon, I took a few test shots with my aperture at ƒ/16. I got my exposure where I liked it and chose a 5-stop bracket with 2 stops underexposed, and 2 stops overexposed. I then sprinted around the canyon rim to get to the spot where my outline would break the horizon and hoped that my wireless trigger would still work! I then ran back around to check the shots and was satisfied, but repeated it again just to make sure.”

See more of Michael Perea’s photography at www.nomadiclensphotos.com and follow him on Facebook and Instagram.

 

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Scale Assignment Winner Michael Perea

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Photo Of The Day By Daryl Hunter

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Photographer, Moraine Lake” by Daryl Hunter. Location: Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada.
Photo By Daryl Hunter

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Photographer, Moraine Lake” by Daryl Hunter. Location: Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada.

A cloudy evening at Moraine Lake in Banff National Park,” describes Hunter. “A nice reflection survived the stormy-looking sky so my buddy Jim and I could capture the magic. I make my friends wear red.”

Equipment & settings: Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF16-35mm f/2.8L II USM, 16.0 mm, 0.8 sec, f/16, ISO 160.

See more of Daryl Hunter’s photography at www.theholepicturesafaris.com.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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Photo Of The Day By Daryl Hunter

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USPS Protect Pollinators Stamps Feature A George Lepp Photo

We’re thrilled to congratulate Outdoor Photographer Field Editor and “Tech Tips” columnist George Lepp on the selection of one of his images to be featured on a new USPS Forever stamp as part of a new series entitled “Protect Pollinators” which is available now.

protect pollinators stamps
The “Protect Pollinators” stamp featuring George Lepp’s photograph.

“I have won the mini Post Office lottery,” Lepp announced in a recent newsletter. “They have chosen one of my images for a stamp that was released today. The series is ‘Protect Pollinators’ and one of the 5 images is mine. The real story,” Lepp explained, “is that I placed this image with the agency Photo Researchers in 1994 (23 years ago) and it is a film image. Fortunately it is sharp and properly exposed and scanned by Photo Researchers to make it a digital image in their files. A Post Office representative chose it from the agency files and now I’m on a ‘Forever’ stamp.” Lepp notes that “There’s not much monetary return after the agency takes their cut, but it’s really about the honor. No credit line, but whatever.”

Lepp, who now resides in Bend, Oregon, was interviewed by Central Oregon Daily about the new stamp. You can watch the video here.

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USPS Protect Pollinators Stamps Feature A George Lepp Photo

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Shoot Outside The Box

Shoot Outside The Box

If you don’t know what “to think outside the box” means, simply translated it’s to think in unconventional ways and view concepts from a different perspective. It often relates to visionary thinking and to look beyond the obvious. Photographically, if you think outside the box you go beyond a simple press of the shutter. You try something outside your comfort zone. You acknowledge the unique and experiment. I share with you some photographic ways to think outside the box.

Time’s Not Up: Get your hands on a neutral-density filter that’s a minimum of 3 stops. Six is better. Stack the two to create 9 stops. Add a polarizer, and you’ll have enough light-stopping capability to obtain slow exposures mid day. Set your ISO to the lowest possible setting and spin the aperture to ƒ/22. Photograph anything that moves—clouds, people, ocean waves, streams, vehicles, athletes—anything is fair game. Create a composition and make a photo. Note the corresponding shutter speed. Check the LCD to evaluate the result. If too much movement occurs, open the aperture, raise the ISO to speed up the shutter or remove one of the ND filters. A whole new world of photography awaits.

Shoot Outside The Box

Point Your Lens Toward The Sun: Use backlight to make creative silhouettes. Find subjects with interesting shapes and sizes. The shape is important because the photo is reduced to the outline of the subject. Use subjects that are outlined with small hairs, as they’ll glow. Expose the image to emphasize the glow. Depending on how much of the sun is included in the viewfinder, you may record flare. Try to exaggerate the flare and use it to your advantage. Let the sun peak out from behind part of the subject and stop the lens down to ƒ/22 to create a sun star effect. Be sure just a small part of the sun is visible. There’s a fine line between including too much and not enough of the sun to produce the star effect from the aperture blades of the lens.

Dig Out An Old Friend: I don’t often use my Lensbaby, but when I do I wonder why I don’t use it more. It’s a fun lens that allows me to bend the plane of focus. Part of the image remains sharp while a different area shows focus distortion. Using this effect, I can lead the viewer to a given part of the image. I maintain sharpness on the part I want the viewer to notice and bend the plane of focus over the other.

Shoot Outside The Box

Flash: Add flash to bring your photography to the next level. Go beyond the simple aspect that it supplements light. Get out the manual and read it—now that’s an outside the box concept in itself. In all seriousness, I encourage you to do so. You’ll discover possibilities you never knew existed. Set the flash to stroboscopic and record movement to create strobe light effects. Try slow speed synch to record movement. Go into manual mode and use a slow shutter speed—pop the flash at the end, beginning or middle of its movement to freeze it at a given point.

Shoot Outside The Box

Did Someone Mention Wind? Wind can wreak havoc on moving subjects. Many photographers who want to photograph fields of flowers sit and wait for a lull. Rather than wait, think outside the box. The stronger the wind, the more the flowers move. Use this to your advantage. Exaggerate the motion to paint color onto the sensor. Fields of flowers, deciduous trees, grasses, curtains in a window, long hair on a model and many other subjects are all fair game. The next time you encounter wind and wish it wasn’t there, take advantage of the hand you’re dealt. You may find yourself wishing it would blow more often!

Light Paint: Dusk, dawn and night work well to light paint. At dusk and dawn, a slight bit of light lives in the sky so your subject shows separation. Try to get an exposure of around 20 seconds. Use a high-power flashlight. At the time you press the shutter, paint the light emitted by the flashlight on your subject. Continue to do so throughout the exposure using even swipes. Be sure you cover all areas of the subject. Evaluate the exposure on the LCD and make adjustments as needed to make sure the exposure from the flashlight and ambient light are married.

Visit www.russburdenphotography.com for information about his nature photography tours and safari to Tanzania.

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Shoot Outside The Box

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