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Photo Of The Day By Lorna Mildice

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Curls” by Lorna Mildice.
Photo By Lorna Mildice

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Curls” by Lorna Mildice.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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Source: Outdoor Photography
Photo Of The Day By Lorna Mildice

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The Marañón River

River trip through the Grand Canyon of the Marañón River in the headwaters of the Amazon River, Peru.

It’s day 10 on our 14-day raft trip down Peru’s Marañón River when Grand Canyon river guide (and chemistry professor) Paul Smolenyak hails me from his raft and yells, “Did you see the giant river otter?”

“What, no way!” I yell back. The giant otter, sometimes called the lobo de rio (river wolf), can grow to over 5 feet long and is a rare and endangered animal. I was amazed at the sighting because this was a repeating pattern during my trip down the Marañón. Each day on the river revealed something new, something unexpected. Photographically, I was documenting all aspects of our journey, but most of my photography time on the river was studying the character and mood of the river itself, which happens to be the longest free-flowing river in the world.

My wife and I joined about 10 of our rafting buddies on this guided trip with the river conservation group Sierra Rios, headed by river explorer and scientist James “Rocky” Contos (sierrarios.org). We learned that the Rio Marañón is the biggest, baddest, coolest river we had never heard of but have known about since we were kids. You see, the Marañón is the hydrological source (measured by water volume) of the Amazon. It seems the Amazon is big enough to have several sources. Since 1971, the source of the Amazon was believed to be the Apurimac River (measured as the farthest source from the sea), but this is contested in a recent article published in the British Royal geographical journal Area by James Contos and Nicholas Tripcevich. Incidentally, a great adventure read is Running the Amazon by Joe Kane, about an expedition descending the Amazon from the known source (Apurimac) to sea.

The Marañón is a river of superlatives. It originates among 20,000-plus foot peaks and flows off the eastern ramparts of the Andes from the Cordillera Huayhuash (a mountain range popularized in Joe Simpson’s mountaineering and survival epic, Touching the Void). As the main hydro-source for the Amazon River, the Marañón can be called the Upper Amazon. Fun facts: when the Marañón reaches the confluence with the Ucayali River and is renamed the Amazon, its volume rivals the flow of the Mississippi. When the Amazon reaches the sea, its volume is eight times bigger than its nearest rival, the Congo River. Annually, the flow of the Amazon amounts to 15 to 20 percent of the world’s fresh water.

We rafted the 180-mile middle section of this 343-mile-long river that is called the Grand Canyon of the Marañón, where the river cuts through a gorge with a view of mountain ridges that rise up to 10,000 feet on both sides of the river. To put that in perspective, the canyon walls through the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River in Arizona reach a height of 5,500 feet. On the banks of the river, we visited Incan and pre-Incan sites, as well as farms and villages growing mangos and papaya.

Having the opportunity to spend 14 days exploring the river by boat and photographing the magnificent canyons, I felt very privileged, since fewer than a thousand people have rafted down this river. As a comparison, the Grand Canyon in Arizona was first run commercially in the early 1960s, and today 24,000 people annually run the river. The Marañón didn’t see its first commercial river trip, organized by Sierra Rios, until 2013.

Today, the almost unknown Marañón is threatened by a massive hydroelectric power scheme. The Peruvian government, in making plans for its economic future, as well as powering new mining projects and being spurred by neighboring Brazil’s growth and demand for energy, set in motion plans for building 20 massive dams, several over 500 feet tall, on the Marañón. On a map, the dams would reduce the world’s longest free-flowing river into a string of reservoirs. The repercussions in moving ahead with this current hydro project on the headwaters of the world’s biggest river would be immediate and manifold and still not clearly understood downriver for the Amazon system as a whole.

One thing is for certain: Just as the Marañón is beginning to be discovered by Peruvians and the world to be an extraordinary river journey on par with the Grand Canyon of the Colorado, that future could be snuffed out for short-term gain. Imagine Peru today if Machu Picchu had been dismantled for practical purposes and used for building stones before the site’s discovery and assessment in 1911 by historian Hiram Bigham. Today, 1.2 million people a year from around the world visit Machu Picchu. Bringing more public awareness about the unique qualities of the Marañón is an important step to addressing how this river can best serve the people of Peru and visitors.

In 2012, Rocky Contos made an exploratory raft and kayak trip down the entire length of the Marañón to the city of Iquitos, Peru. That trip convinced him to offer regular guided trips through all three sections of the river. He wrote in American Whitewater magazine in August 2013: “I personally descended the entire 1,750 km length of the Rio Marañón last year in kayak, raft and passenger boat over the course of about two months. I discovered the most distant source of the Amazon River last year (Rio Mantaro), and as part of my exploratory expeditions, in part sponsored by National Geographic, I paddled all of the headwaters of the Amazon (Rios Marañón, Mantaro, Apurimac and Urubamba). One of the most important conclusions of all my studies is that Rio Marañón is by far the most precious of all these rivers: it is beautiful, unpolluted, raftable, holds monumental stature as the hydrological source of the Amazon, and is an extreme joy to experience.”

As photographers, we have an obligation to document and bring attention to places like the Marañón and other threatened natural areas in the world. David Brower, an environmentalist and director of the Sierra Club for 18 years, had one great regret in life, and that was he did not stop the Glen Canyon dam project on the Colorado River. This is not a regret he would repeat; he worked hard to defeat two additional dams keeping the Colorado River intact and free flowing through the Grand Canyon. The Sierra Club’s “Don’t Dam the Grand Canyon” campaign involved bringing public awareness to the river via river trips and photography. I still cherish my copy of The Place No One Knew: Glen Canyon on the Colorado, photographed by Eliot Porter. On the back cover of that book, David Brower writes, “Remember these things lost. The native wildlife; the chance to float quietly down a calm river, to let the current carry you past a thousand years of history, through a living canyon of incredible, haunting beauty. Here the Colorado had created a display that rivaled any in the world. The side canyons simply had no rivals. We lost wholeness, integrity in place…a magnificent gesture of the natural world.”

The image here is our river camp on a massive beach typical in the Marañón’s Grand Canyon section. What you can’t see in the photo are the high winds that sweep this beach. It made for a miserable night’s sleep, but if we wanted a good night’s sleep, we would have stayed home. Grab your camera and a paddle, and get down to Peru and see the Marañón yourself. Adventure on.

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Source: Outdoor Photography
The Marañón River

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Photo Of The Day By Laura Roberts

Today's Photo Of The Day is “Lupine Sunset” by Laura Roberts. Location: Joshua Tree National Park, California.
Photo By Laura Roberts

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Lupine Sunset” by Laura Roberts. Location: Joshua Tree National Park, California.

“Lupine, brown-eyed primroses and poppies bloom under the colors of a sunset at Joshua Tree National Park during the 2017 super bloom,” says Roberts.

See more of Laura Roberts’ photography at www.aov.photo.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

The post Photo Of The Day By Laura Roberts appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.


Source: Outdoor Photography
Photo Of The Day By Laura Roberts

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Tamron Announces 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD Zoom

Designed for use with APS-sensor Canon and Nikon DSLRs, the Tamron 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD (Model B028) has an impressive 22.2x zoom range, covering a wide-angle to super telephoto focal length range equivalent to approximately 27-600mm. That range makes this all-in-one zoom capable of handling practically any subject, from landscapes to wildlife close-ups.

Tamron 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD (Model B028)
Tamron 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD (Model B028)

With the versatility of this range, this lens should be an excellent option for travel photography and situations where keeping your gear to a minimum is advantageous.

The Vibration Compensation system in the lens is reported to provide 2.5 stops of correction which, while not as forgiving as the more advanced 5-stop system found in the Tamron SP 70-200mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2 (Model A025), will still be helpful when shooting at the longer end of the zoom range.

The lens design is very compact at under 5 inches and weighs about 25 ounces (length and weight vary slightly between the Canon and Nikon models, see full specs below). It also features styling and ergonomics in line with newer Tamron “G2” lenses that have been introduced in the last two years.

Availability is expected in July at an estimated street price of $649. View the new lens on the Tamron USA site: http://www.tamron-usa.com/product/lenses/b028.html.

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Specifications: Tamron 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD (Model B028)

Model
: B028
Focal Length
: 18-400mm
Maximum Aperture
: F/3.5-6.3
Angle of View (diagonal)
: 75°33′ – 4° (for APS-C format)
Optical Construction
:16 elements in 11 groups
Minimum Object Distance
:17.7 in (0.45m)
Maximum Magnification Ratio
: 1:2.9
Filter Size
: Ø72mm
Maximum Diameter
: Ø79mm
Length**
: for Canon 4.9 in (123.9mm)
: for Nikon 4.8 in (121.4mm)
Weight
: for Canon 25 oz (710g)
: for Nikon24.9 oz (705g)
Aperture Blades
: 7 (circular diaphragm)
Minimum Aperture
: F/22-40
Image Stabilization Performance
: 2.5 stops (CIPA Standards Compliant)
(For Canon : EOS-80D is used / For Nikon: D7200 is used)
Standard Accessories
: Flower-shaped lens hood, Lens caps
Compatible Mounts
: Canon, Nikon
Model
: B028
* The minimum object distance may change if camera is used in live view mode.
** Length is the distance from the front tip of the lens to the lens mount face.

Specifications, appearance, functionality, etc. subject to change without notice.

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INTRODUCING THE WORLD’S FIRST[1] ULTRA-TELEPHOTO ALL-IN-ONE ZOOM LENS WITH AN EXTENDED RANGE THAT COVERS 18-400MM

Dramatic extended range achieved by combining cutting-edge optical design and other new breakthrough technologies including a redesigned cam structure

18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD (Model B028)

June 23, 2017, Commack, NY- Tamron, a leading manufacturer of optics for diverse applications, announces the launch of the new 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD (Model B028), the world’s first ultra-telephoto all-in-one zoom lens for APS-C DSLR cameras, which covers a focal length range of 18-400mm. Since the 1992 launch of its AF28-200mm F/3.8-5.6 Aspherical (Model 71D), Tamron has dominated the all-in-one zoom category and has produced many lenses that cover wide-angle to telephoto zoom ranges. Tamron has now developed an ultra-telephoto all-in-one zoom that extends to 400mm (35mm equivalent of 620mm) and provides a 22.2x zoom ratio. Packed in a light, compact body (4.8in./24.9oz.)[2] is Tamron’s accumulated knowledge and experience for all-in-one zoom lenses, including the most advanced optical and mechanical designs, an HLD (High/Low torque modulated Drive) for the AF system and the Vibration Compensation system. Photographers can now enjoy wide-angle to ultra-telephoto photography using one lens, which is ideal for travel photography and eliminates the need to carry extra lenses. The new Model B028 lens enables photographing a wide variety of ultra-telephoto images including everyday casual scenes. The 18-400mm will be available in the U.S. at the end of July at $649.

PRODUCT HIGHLIGHTS
 
1. The world’s first ultra-telephoto all-in-one zoom lens to achieve 400mm telephoto
The new Model B028 is the world’s first lens for APS-C DSLR cameras that covers a focal length range of 18-400mm and achieves a zoom ratio of 22.2x. The focal length of 400mm on the telephoto end enables the capturing of ultra-telephoto pictures with the 35mm equivalent of 620mm angle of view. Now, with just this one lens, a photographer can readily enjoy the power of ultra-telephoto to bring distant subjects closer as well as the perspective-flattening effects that only extreme telephoto settings can achieve. This all-in-one zoom lens is ideal for travel and everyday shooting. It allows a photographer to switch from wide-angle to ultra-telephoto without changing lenses, making it faster and easier to capture a much wider range of subjects including travel scenes, wildlife, action sports, landscapes, cityscapes, portraits and food.
2. Excellent image quality across the entire zoom range, from wide-angle to ultra-telephoto and macro
The optical construction of the B028 consists of 16 lens elements in 11 groups. The use of specialized glass elements such as LD (Low Dispersion) and aspherical lens elements effectively minimizes wide-ranging aberrations, including chromatic aberrations and distortion, thereby assuring outstanding image quality. Optimum power distribution among the individual lens element groups achieves both the optical performance and the compact size necessary for an ultra-telephoto all-in-one zoom lens that boasts 400mm focal length. Also, it enables tele-macro photography with a maximum magnification ratio of 1:2.9.
3. Lightweight and compact design exhibits Tamron’s basic philosophy for all-in-one zoom lenses
Despite being an all-in-one zoom lens that achieves 400mm ultra-telephoto, Model B028 is light and compact with a total length of 4.8 in. and a weight of 24.9 oz.[3]  A new lens barrel design utilizing three-step extensions was developed to enable the necessary elongation to produce a 22.2x zoom ratio. Compared to the conventional approach, the division into a larger number of cams ensures comfortable operation and stability while zooming. Tamron’s philosophy for all-in-one zoom lenses is to allow each photographer to casually capture everyday photos with a lens of a practical size, and Model B028 fulfills this philosophy.
4. HLD motor provides high-precision AF and enables compact lens construction

The AF drive system for Model B028 uses Tamron’s exclusive HLD (High/Low torque modulated Drive) motor. The power-saving HLD motor produces outstanding driving torque, and adjusts motor rotation from low to high speed to enable accurate and quiet focusing. The HLD motor takes up less space thanks to its small size and circular arc shape that allows the size of the lens to be reduced.

5. Equipped with the Vibration Compensation system necessary for ultra-telephotography at 400mm
Despite its compact size, Model B028 is equipped with Tamron’s proprietary VC (Vibration Compensation) system, which effectively curbs camera shake under low light conditions (such as a dimly lit room or at dusk) and while taking ultra-telephoto pictures. This greatly expands opportunities for casual handheld shooting. The shake-free stability of the viewfinder image allows for easier framing and enables the photographer to compose the subject quickly and comfortably.
6. Electromagnetic diaphragm system now used also for Nikon-mount lenses
The electromagnetic diaphragm system, which has been a standard feature for Canon-mount lenses, is now employed in Nikon-mount lenses[4]. More precise diaphragm and aperture control is possible because the diaphragm blades are driven and controlled by a motor through electronic pulse signals.
7. User-friendly features for everyday comfortable use
With an eye toward active outdoor photography, Model B028 features Moisture-Resistant Construction to ensure worry-free shooting as well as confidence while shooting under adverse weather conditions. Also, the Zoom Lock mechanism prevents undesired movement of the lens barrel under its own weight when the camera is angled downward while walking.
8. Compatible with TAP-in ConsoleTM, an optional accessory product
The optional TAP-in Console provides a USB connection to a personal computer, enabling the user to easily update the lens’s firmware as well as to customize features, including fine adjustments to the AF and VC.
9. External design placing importance on functionality and ease of use

While inheriting the design that makes use of many organic curves and the delicately polished form down to fine details that characterize the SP lens series, the new Model B028 comes with a highly sophisticated design that also places a lot of importance on the lens’s functionality and ease of use, featuring an overall form that faithfully encompasses the internal structures within, a slim Luminous Gold brand ring and the switch shape design.


[1] Among interchangeable lenses for DSLR cameras (As of May 2017; Tamron)
[2] Length and weight are based on the Nikon-mount lens
[3]Length and weight are based on figures for the Nikon-mount lens.
[4]Available only with cameras compatible with the electromagnetic diaphragm (D3100, D3200, D3300, D3400, D5000, D5100, D5200, D5300, D5500, D5600, D7000, D7100, D7200, D300S, D500) (As of May, 2017; Tamron)

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Source: Outdoor Photography
Tamron Announces 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD Zoom

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Photo Of The Day By Tom Barnwell

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Broadtailed Hummingbirds at Thistle” by Tom Barnwell. Location: Springerville, AZ.
Photo By Tom Barnwell

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Broadtailed Hummingbirds at Thistle” by Tom Barnwell. Location: Springerville, AZ.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

The post Photo Of The Day By Tom Barnwell appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.


Source: Outdoor Photography
Photo Of The Day By Tom Barnwell

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Photo Of The Day By Adam Hill

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Lupins in Bloom” by Adam Hill. Location: North Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Photo By Adam Hill

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Lupins in Bloom” by Adam Hill. Location: North Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada.

“Lupins decorate the countryside in eastern Canada and they quickly cover the landscape with purples, whites, blues and pinks,” says Hill.

See more of Adam Hill’s photography at www.adamhillstudios.ca.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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Source: Outdoor Photography
Photo Of The Day By Adam Hill

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Photographer Profile: Curtis S Andersen

Photographer Profile: Curtis S Andersen
Clark Lake National Park, Alaska. Nikon D500, Tamron 150/600mm, Gitzo tripod. Exposure: ISO 400, 1/800 f5.6 600mm.

Photographer: Curtis S Andersen

Amateur Photographer

Photographic Specialties:

  • Landscape
  • Wildlife
  • Travel
  • Macro

Biography

I am retired from work, but not from LIFE. I focus on the outdoors and travel and take the camera along for the ride, and I am learning the art of photography as I go. Most of the pictures I take are of nature, landscape, wildlife and macro. I will dabble in other areas at times. One has to be careful because any rabbit hole one goes down in photography will cost you MONEY!!!

Social

www.facebook.com/curtis.s.andersen.7

www.instagram.com/curtissandersen

Photographer Profile: Curtis S Andersen
Green River Lake Wind Rivers, Wyoming. Exposure: ISO 100, 1/64 f11 16mm.
Photographer Profile: Curtis S Andersen
Upper Green River Valley, Wyoming. Nikon D800, Nikor 28/300mm. Exposure: ISO 400, 1/3200 f 6.3 150mm.
Photographer Profile: Curtis S Andersen
Farmington Bay Bird Refuge, Utah. Nikon D500, Tamron 150/600mm. Exposure: ISO 400, 1/6400 f5.6 600mm.

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Source: Outdoor Photography
Photographer Profile: Curtis S Andersen

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Photographer Profile: Gilbert Stetson

Photographer Profile: Gilbert Stetson
A confluence of the Alsek & Tat rivers in the Yukon. Pentax *ist DS. Exposure: 1/4 sec, f25, ISO 200, focal length 24mm.

Photographer: Gilbert Stetson

Amateur Photographer

Photographic Specialties:

  • Landscape
  • Wildlife

Biography

I’ve been doing photography for the past 40 years, mainly wildlife and scenic. Working as an in home photographer for 2 1/2 years for Americana Portraits before working for Olan Mills as a studio photographer and trainer. I made the switch to digital in 2006 and like the greater control of working on my images in the digital darkroom over working with film and the ability to see if you got the shot I was after. I’m always looking for ways to improve my photography through reading and workshops, even attending two workshops with Scott Kelby. Vacations are usually planned around my photography.

Website

www.gilbertstetson.com

Photographer Profile: Gilbert Stetson
Crater Lake, Delaware Water Gap National Park, NJ. This image was taken while sitting in my kayak with the wind moving and turning the kayak as I’m trying to compose and focus the image. This took several attempts, as I had to keep repositioning the kayak hoping the frog wouldn’t get skittish and leap into the water. Pentax K20D, Tamron AF70-300 f/4-5.6 LD Macro w/polarizer. Exposure: 1/45 sec, f/5.6, ISO 400, focal length 300.

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Source: Outdoor Photography
Photographer Profile: Gilbert Stetson

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Photographer Profile: Elena Burnett

Photographer Profile: Elena Burnett
Yosemite National Park. Challenge: Nighttime exposure with a nearly full moon rising and still capture stars without too much streaking. Ability to capture shadow details to give interest and depth of field. Sony A7RII, Metabones adapter, Canon EF16-35mm f2.8, MeFOTO tripod. Exposure: 30 sec @ f2.8, 16mm, ISO 200.

Photographer: Elena Burnett

Amateur Photographer

Photographic Specialties:

  • Landscape

Biography

I always enjoyed the outdoors from my childhood in NE PA where I was usually outdoors exploring fields & forests, swimming in local ponds & lakes, and ice skating; to hiking, backpacking, and snow skiing as an adult in So CA. Over the last few years, I began to feel I was moving too fast to truly take in and enjoy my surroundings. Thus I embarked on beginning my photography education through school and workshops so that I might learn to slow down, truly see, breath in, and feel my environment. The camera has helped me better see life and our planet, and develop a greater appreciation for both.

Website

elenaburnett.smugmug.com

www.flickr.com/photos/143399538@N08/

Photographer Profile: Elena Burnett
Palisades Glacier area Sierra Nevada, CA. Challenge: First solo multiple night backpacking trip carrying 50 lbs. of equipment over approximately 7 miles with a gain of over 3,000 in elevation. Nikon D5500, 18-55mm lens, Slik tripod. Exposure: 1/160 sec @f13, ISO 100.
Photographer Profile: Elena Burnett
Antelope Valley Poppy Reserve. This is an HDR image using two exposures to maintain highlights, shadow/foreground detail, and colors. Sony A7RII, FE 24-70mm lens, MeFOTO tripod. Exposure: 1/10 and 1.6 sec @ f11, ISO 100.

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Source: Outdoor Photography
Photographer Profile: Elena Burnett

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Photographer Profile: Dennis Sabo

Photographer Profile: Dennis Sabo
Capers Island, South Carolina. Capers Island, boneyard beach is a 30-minute fishing boat ride from the Isle of Palms mainland near Charleston, SC. Only the slight hum from the outboard motor could be noticed as the cloaking darkness of pre-morning still wrapped around our small fishing boat. I think I would have felt better regarding the passage if the captain hadn’t said that he hadn’t made this crossing in the dark before but I still was excited about getting to Capers Island for an opportunity to view and witness the boneyard beach at sunrise. The challenge was the short amount of time we had on the island—only 45 minutes to work various compositions and get the light just right. Canon 5D Mark III, 24-105mm lens.

Photographer: Dennis Sabo

Full-Time Professional Photographer

Photographic Specialties:

  • Landscape
  • Wildlife
  • Travel

Biography

Dennis Sabo is an internationally honored photographer specializing in contemporary abstract, landscape, and seascape photography. His award-winning work has appeared in various publications and institutions, among them National Geographic, NOVA, PBS, Canon, and the Anthology of Appalachian Photographers.

Dennis is considered to be a master at transforming an image into something the viewer can connect with emotionally. His fine art nature abstracts and landscapes are often sought out by art collectors and interior designers and have been included in solo and group art gallery exhibitions.

Website

www.dsabophoto.com

Social

www.facebook.com/DennisSaboPhotography

www.houzz.com/pro/dsabo38/__public

Photographer Profile: Dennis Sabo
Arcadia Beach, Arch Cape, OR. A reasonable amount of time after sunset when most photographers collapsed their tripods and headed back up to their cars one French photographer and myself remained on the beach. It was an ethereal moment in time as the sun’s yellows and oranges had disappeared and now the only colors were blues and pinks. When I got home and finished post production on this image I realized I had captured something special; a moment in time preserved in color and a composition that allows each and every viewer a different emotional experience. Patience was the biggest creative challenge and technically having waterproof boots, socks, and pants while standing in 10 inches of water for over an hour also helped. Canon 5D Mark III, 24-105mm lens.
Last Dollar Road, Telluride, CO. Getting the proper compositional look from a vertical pan and slow shutter speed was the biggest challenge.
Photographer Profile: Dennis Sabo
Steptoe Butte, Steptoe, WA. We had misjudged time from hotel to Steptoe Butte so our biggest challenge was to compose a good shot before we lost the fog and wonderful light. We didn’t even make it up to the viewpoint. I saw this halfway up the butte and had my friend stop the car. Working quickly I was able to fire off several series of exposures to complete this HDR image in postproduction. Canon 5D Mark II, 100-400mm lens.
Photographer Profile: Dennis Sabo
Fall Creek Falls State Park, Spencer, TN. Canon 5D Mark II, 24-105mm lens.

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Source: Outdoor Photography
Photographer Profile: Dennis Sabo

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