Christopher Kilkus Photographer

Christopher Kilkus Fashion Advertising Photography Website

Author: Chris Kilkus (page 1 of 27)

Showcase: August 2017

Showcase: August 2017
Dream Valley By Michael Arzur

“At the heart of the valley of Dévoluy in the French Alps, I decided to camp to capture the magic light of the sunset. I chose this place because I like the perspective of this mountain—it looks like a cathedral, and at sunset the light at this location is amazing. The sky became this incredible color, which was a very wonderful moment for a landscape photographer.”

Nikon D610, Tamron SP 24-70mm F/2.8 Di VC USD at 24mm, Cokin Z-Pro G2 Soft ND8 filter, PrimaPhoto tripod. Exposure: 1/6 sec., ƒ/16, ISO 100; panorama composite of three images.

See more of Michael Arzur’s photography at arzurmichaelphotographie.com.

Showcase: August 2017
An Evening Walk By Sumistha Das

“This image was taken in Merced National Wildlife Refuge, Merced, California, during migration season in February. After unsuccessfully trying for several hours to get a good shot of sandhill cranes landing on a field, I was leaving the park and the sun was setting in the horizon. Suddenly, I saw four cranes fly over me and land on a nearby wetland. I focused my camera, and what I saw through the viewfinder was beautiful—these four cranes were slowly walking in a line. The encounter lasted only for few minutes, but I got my picture of the day!”

Nikon D810, Sigma 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary. Exposure: 1/640 sec., ƒ/7.1, ISO 500.

See more of Sumistha Das’ photography at facebook.com/MyBodhiMind.

Showcase: August 2017
Spirits Dwell Here By Randy Baumhover

“Every year in late May, I make the three-hour drive south from my home in Florence, Oregon, to Redwoods National and State Parks, California. That’s the time of year when at least some rhododendron will be in bloom. My goal was to shoot some of them among the big trees, and if there was fog, that would be all the better. This year, I was about one week early for my favorite locations—Damnation Creek Trail and Lady Bird Johnson Grove. There was one very nice patch right along the west side of Highway 101, just north of Damnation Creek trailhead. The color and light were excellent, and the fog added to the mood. All elements came together. To me, there’s no more mystical, magical place than the redwoods. It fills me up with good things, and it renews my soul.”

Nikon D800, AF-S NIKKOR 24-70mm F2.8G ED, Manfrotto tripod, Tiffen circular polarizer. Exposure: 2.5 sec., ƒ/7.1, ISO 500.

See more of Randy Baumhover’s photography at ranbo.smugmug.com.

The post Showcase: August 2017 appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.


Source: Outdoor Photography
Showcase: August 2017

{$excerpt:n}

Photo Of The Day By Michel Hersen

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Afternoon at the Oxbow” by Michel Hersen. Location: Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming.
Photo By Michel Hersen

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Afternoon at the Oxbow” by Michel Hersen. Location: Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming.

Equipment & Settings: Nikon D7100, Nikkor Zoom Lens (18-200mm), Hoya Circular Polarizer,Gitzo Tripod and Arca-Swiss Head. ISO 200, F/20, 1/8th-second exposure, and a focal length of 62mm.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

The post Photo Of The Day By Michel Hersen appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.


Source: Outdoor Photography
Photo Of The Day By Michel Hersen

{$excerpt:n}

Photo Of The Day By Teri Franzen

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Skimming Away” by Teri Franzen. Location: Nickerson Beach in Long Beach, NY.
Photo By Teri Franzen

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Skimming Away” by Teri Franzen. Location: Nickerson Beach in Long Beach, NY.

“A recent Friday morning found me sitting at the edge of a pool of water on the shore of Nickerson Beach in Long Beach, NY,” says Franzen. “The water had been perfectly still and I hoped Black Skimmers might make their way over in search of food. The image I envisioned involves a skimmer flying towards me, connecting to the water and showing the narrowness of its bill. Occasionally, one or two of them did skim through, but far more often on the way out rather than in my direction. I don’t normally shoot birds flying away, but the sight was so intriguing I made an exception with this frame-filling moment.”

See more of Teri Franzen’s photography at terifranzenphotography.com.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

The post Photo Of The Day By Teri Franzen appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.


Source: Outdoor Photography
Photo Of The Day By Teri Franzen

{$excerpt:n}

Last Frame: Food Fight!

Last Frame: Food Fight!
Photo By Jerry amEnde

The Susquehanna River in northern Maryland is full of activity in the fall when migrating bald eagles gather to feed on fish, and Jerry amEnde was there to catch the action. “Bald eagles are thieves by nature and often would rather steal a meal than catch it,” he explains. “Once a fish is caught, a free-for-all ensues as other eagles attempt to steal the catch. In this photo, a juvenile bald eagle attempts to grab a fish from an adult. Juvenile eagles are various shades of brown and don’t acquire their characteristic fully white head and tail until they’re about 5 years old.”

Canon EOS-1D X, Canon EF 500mm F/4L IS USM and 1.4x teleconverter, Gitzo tripod, Wimberley gimbal head. Exposure: 1/2000 sec., ƒ/7.1, ISO 2500.

See more of Jerry amEnde’s photography at photos.amendegw.com.

 

The post Last Frame: Food Fight! appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.


Source: Outdoor Photography
Last Frame: Food Fight!

{$excerpt:n}

Hasselblad X1D Review

Redwoods in Bothe-Napa Valley State Park, Hasselblad X1D
A long exposure of a creek through the redwoods in Bothe-Napa Valley State Park, California. Exposure: 5 sec., ƒ/22, ISO 100.

When I first read the announcement of the Hasselblad X1D, I realized a new chapter in medium format photography was about to unfold. The prospect of a mirrorless medium format camera that weighed just 1.6 pounds and was similar in size to a 35mm DSLR was truly groundbreaking. The specs of the Hasselblad X1D are impressive: a 50-megapixel 43.8 x 32.9mm medium format CMOS sensor delivering 14 stops of dynamic range; a new line of Hasselblad XCD lenses with integral central shutter (there is no focal plane shutter in the camera); an XGA electronic viewfinder and high-resolution LCD display with touchscreen; an ISO range of 100 to 25,600; and internal WiFi capability making it usable with the proprietary Phocus mobile device app from Hasselblad. Plus, the price point of the Hasselblad X1D is much less than the H-series Hasselblad cameras—the body is priced at $8,995 and lenses in the $2,300 to $4,000 range. An adapter is also available that allows use of the HC lenses from Hasselblad.

Readers will be aware of my affinity for medium format photography from reading my previous articles in Outdoor Photographer, most recently “The Medium Format Landscape.” I specialize in creating large prints, including wall-sized murals, from my landscape photography. Because of the correlation between image resolution and print size, I rely on the high megapixel count and image quality of medium format cameras in order to achieve the print quality I need for my work.

Wild mustard flowers, Hasselblad X1D
Wild mustard flowers cover fields in the Napa Valley in the late winter. Small aperture was used to maximize depth of field. Great detail and clarity is provided by the camera’s 50-megapixel sensor and the 30mm XCD lens. Exposure: 1/40 sec., ƒ/16, ISO 400.

One of the issues I have had with medium format camera systems is their size and weight. As landscape photographers, we often need to hike, ski or bike to locations far from our vehicles to get our shots. The difference between carrying 3 pounds of camera equipment versus 12 pounds becomes very noticeable after a few miles on the trail. I was eager to determine if the Hasselblad X1D would usher in a new era of medium format quality in a sub 3-pound kit.

My demo Hasselblad X1D arrived along with the XCD 30mm f/3.5 lens, a 24mm-equivalent focal length weighing 1.2 pounds that is ideal for my style of landscape photography. My approach to camera reviews is not to focus on “lab style” tests but rather to take it out into the field and see if I can capture gallery-quality images under real-world shooting conditions.

My first impression of the camera is that it feels very sturdy in hand. The production quality of the body and lenses seems impeccable. There is nothing that feels “plastic” or fragile on this camera. It feels as if it has been created from a solid block of metal. A lot of thought has been put into the layout and design of the buttons and menu system of this camera, with nothing extraneous or gimmicky.

Grove of redwood trees in Bothe-Napa Valley State Park, Hasselblad X1D
Looking up in a grove of redwood trees in Bothe-Napa Valley State Park, California. The dynamic range of the sensor can capture the highlights of the sky and the darker tones of the trunks in one frame. Exposure: 1/6 sec., ƒ/22, ISO 100.

Startup of the camera is not instantaneous, but rather takes a few seconds. I did not find this to be an issue for my style of shooting. The EVF activates when putting your eye up to the viewfinder, or the rear LCD can be used if composing without the EVF. I find it easier to compose in daylight using the EVF, but in shady or darker conditions the rear LCD screen works well. One of the great benefits of live view is the ability to zoom in on a subject and use manual focus to fine tune the focus. This can be done in both the EVF and on the rear LCD. There is no live histogram readout for exposure during live view, and no playback of images in the EVF, so those are two features that hopefully Hasselblad can add with future firmware updates.

The Hasselblad X1D focus system offers an array of 35 autofocus points across the field of view that can be individually selected. I found this incredibly useful for composition and focusing. Selecting the AF point on the LCD touchscreen or via the EVF is a very simple process that makes it much easier to capture images without having to focus and recompose using one central AF point. While multiple AF points are common on modern DSLRs, they are a relatively new feature on medium format cameras. I found the autofocus to be accurate in my test shots with the camera. The camera settings are very easy to adjust via the touchscreen or through the viewfinder with the various buttons.

I received one battery with the demo camera, so I had to be mindful of battery usage. I found that a battery would last fine for a day of intermittent shooting. If I were to purchase a system, I would be sure to get at least three batteries. Video recording will likely also increase battery usage rates. I did do some test videos with the camera. The X1D will record HD video at 1920x1080p using H.264 encoding. I noticed that video recording requires very close attention to depth of field. With the large size of the sensor, there is less depth of field at a given aperture, so it is important to be aware that a video recorded at ƒ/8 aperture may have out-of-focus areas that are very noticeable in video playback. For landscape videos requiring good depth of field, I found I would need to use an aperture of ƒ/16 to ƒ/22. The HD video quality is excellent, and there is a mini HDMI port that allows connection to an external video recorder as well.

However, with the advent of 4K TVs and the demand for 4K resolution video, it would be nice if the Hasselblad X1D offered an option to record video in 4K.

Redwood trunks, Hasselblad X1D
The crisp 30mm XCD lens and 50-megapixel medium format sensor provide great detail in this image of redwood trunks. Exposure: 3.2 sec., ƒ/22, ISO 100.

I shot both handheld and on a tripod with the X1D. I would definitely use an L-plate that fits the camera so it would be easy to attach to a tripod both vertically and horizontally. There is not currently a cable release available for the camera, so I either used the self-timer set for 2 seconds or the Phocus mobile app. The Phocus mobile app worked very well once paired with the camera’s own WiFi signal (which does not require internet access or cell reception). With the Phocus mobile app, you can use your smartphone or tablet as a viewfinder, control aperture and shutter speed, and review images and exposure data. Using the app on an iPad is a great way to get a huge image preview using live view or as a way to instantly review captured images. Other reviews have commented on the apparent shutter lag with the camera and the multiple clicks when the shutter button is pressed. I did not find this to be an issue with my shooting—it is possible I had a more up-to-date firmware that addressed these issues. This is not really a camera designed for fast-paced sports or wildlife shooting, though. The specs state the camera can shoot just 1.7 to 2.3 frames per second.

One of the benefits of lenses with integral leaf shutters is that very fast flash sync speeds are possible. The Hasselblad X1D offers up to 1/2000 sec. shutter speed for photographers who also work with strobe lighting, opening up a lot of creative options for flash photography. I was very impressed with the quality of the XCD 30mm f/3.5 lens. It is incredibly sharp, and there was no distortion or chromatic aberration in the corners of the image frame. Even though Lightroom did not yet have lens profile corrections available for the X1D, I processed all my test images in Lightroom and was very impressed with the image quality. I prefer using Lightroom over Hasselblad’s proprietary Phocus software, since I find it easier and faster to use and have been most pleased with Lightroom’s RAW processing capabilities. One important step in developing Hasselblad images in Lightroom is to select the “embedded” profile in the “Camera Calibration” box to ensure the best color profile is applied.

Hot-air balloon, Hasselblad X1D
This handheld shot at ISO 800 shows the camera’s versatility to capture handheld medium format images in low morning light. Exposure: 1/250 sec., ƒ/22, ISO 800.

For my tripod-based shots I used a lower ISO of 100 to maximize image quality, which is my standard practice for all cameras. If I needed a faster shutter speed to capture wildflowers blowing in the wind, or to accommodate the faster shutter speeds needed for handheld shooting, I used higher ISOs between 400 and 800. I also experimented with the upper-reach ISOs of 12,800 and 25,000. At ISO 800, I found that I was able to shoot handheld at ƒ/22, even in low-light conditions. I recommend using a shutter speed of 2x the lens focal length with such a high-resolution sensor and no image stabilization (for the 30mm lens, use 1/60 sec., for example). I was amazed at the quality of the files generated by this camera, even at ISO 800. I found exquisite detail and no visible noise in the ISO 800 files. Most importantly, because of the resolution and quality of the pixel data, I was able to enlarge these files to huge print sizes (95×78 inches) with little loss of image quality. The “enlarge-ability” of medium format files is one of their main advantages to me over files from smaller sensors.

Handholding medium format at ƒ/22 and ISO 800 opens up great new opportunities for capturing fine-art-quality images. ISO 3200 and 6400 produced usable files for magazine publication but would require some noise reduction for use as fine-art prints. At ISO 12,800 and 25,600, there is more noticeable noise, but if you need to photograph a sasquatch in the dark woods, it could produce a usable image.

Napa Valley, Hasselblad X1D
This shot was taken handheld. Shows a view of the rural northern end of the Napa Valley. Auto exposure was able to accurately capture a range of tones from bright clouds to darker hills. Image shows great detail upon zooming in to 100 percent. Exposure: 1/180 sec., ƒ/16, ISO 200.

The other important factor in image quality—besides resolution and high ISO performance—is dynamic range, which determines how much shadow and highlight detail can be captured in single exposure. The Hasselblad X1D excels in dynamic range. It is possible to pull out great detail in the shadows while still holding exposure detail in the very bright parts of the image. I often bracket images when in challenging lighting conditions and have difficulty imagining a scenario where a three-stop bracket would not give you all exposure data you could ever need.

I think the Hasselblad X1D strikes a great balance between image quality, features and weight in the new medium format mirrorless category. The appeal of medium format mirrorless systems is having a more lightweight and portable camera that maintains medium format image quality. This system would easily fit in a jacket pocket or waist pack for a day of biking or skiing. It is truly liberating and empowering to travel unburdened by camera weight in the outdoors, knowing that you have one of the world’s best imaging devices in your pocket.

The post Hasselblad X1D Review appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.


Source: Outdoor Photography
Hasselblad X1D Review

{$excerpt:n}

Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II: Speed & Precision

Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II, Olympus M.Zuiko 40-150mm f2.8 PRO. Exposure: 1/1500 sec., ƒ/6.7, ISO 400. Photo by Olympus Visionary Scott Bourne.

Arguably, no photographic subject is more challenging than capturing birds in flight. “Take eagles, for example,” explains Olympus Visionary Scott Bourne, “which change direction mid-air at 40 mph. Your AF system has to be up to the challenge.”

Bourne found the perfect camera for his photography in the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II. Capable of capturing up to 18 frames per second with Continuous AF Tracking using its electronic shutter, the camera provides the speed and precision that Bourne needs to record the sharp, detailed images of birds in flight that have earned him a stellar reputation among clients and fans.

He judged the system critically as any professional would, and decided to sell his professional DSLR system to make the switch to the much lighter OM-D E-M1 Mark II. “I can’t pretend I have an eagle in sharp focus—it either is or it isn’t,” Bourne says. But for Bourne’s work, the advantages of the Olympus system go beyond those of mere physical weight and size. “Up until now, there hasn’t been tracking AF reliable enough to do what I do,” he says. Referring to the OM-D E-M1 Mark II’s AF system, Bourne notes the exceptional performance of its 121 AF points that cover the entire sensor. “That gives you an advantage right off the bat. Once I have made appropriate adjustments to set the AF system correctly, depending on my subject, my keeper rate exceeds that of my previous pro cameras. When I switched to the Olympus system, my clients didn’t notice.”

For Bourne, it’s not just the impressive capabilities of his camera but also the extensive lens selection that make the Olympus system the best choice for him. His go-to lenses are the M.Zuiko 40-150mm f2.8 PRO and 300mm f4.0 IS PRO. Speaking of the 40-150mm f2.8 PRO, Bourne says, “I’m in love with that range,” which, with the camera’s Micro Four Thirds sensor, gives him an equivalent of 80-300mm. “When I’m shooting eagles in Alaska, for example, 75 percent or more of my images are taken with that lens.”

If he needs extra telephoto reach, it’s the 300mm F4, equivalent to a 600mm super-tele. “That lens is amazing. I can’t say enough about it. It’s one of the most impressive lenses ever created,” he says. It’s exceedingly sharp, and Bourne notes its superior close-focusing capability. “A close-focusing distance of less than 5 feet—instead of 15 feet with lenses of equivalent focal length for DSLRs—means I can fill a frame with a bird’s eye if I want to, while remaining at a respectful distance.”

Another big advantage is Olympus’s advanced 5-Axis Image Stabilization, which compensates for all types of camera motion to provide up to 5.5 stops of correction when shooting handheld, giving Bourne the freedom to react quickly to his fast-moving subjects. And because this technology is built-in to the camera body, it’s available no matter which lens Bourne chooses.

To those photographers who are wary of trading their large DSLRs for a mirrorless system, Bourne is quick to reassure. “I’m making 30×40-inch prints with the images from my OM-D E-M1 Mark II. And with its much lighter weight, I can stay out and shoot longer, which is a huge advantage for wildlife photography.”

Hear more from other photographers who have made the switch to the Olympus OM-D system at getolympus.com/neverlookback.

The post Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II: Speed & Precision appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.


Source: Outdoor Photography
Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II: Speed & Precision

{$excerpt:n}

Photo Of The Day By Lana Gramlich

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Windy Pine Savanna” by Lana Gramlich. Location: Abita Flatwoods Preserve, Louisiana.
Photo By Lana Gramlich

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Windy Pine Savanna” by Lana Gramlich. Location: Abita Flatwoods Preserve, Louisiana.

Gramlich describes the image as “Wet pine savanna on a windy, autumn afternoon.”

See more of Lana Gramlich’s photography on Facebook.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

The post Photo Of The Day By Lana Gramlich appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.


Source: Outdoor Photography
Photo Of The Day By Lana Gramlich

{$excerpt:n}

Five Favorite Fall Color Tips

Five Favorite Fall Color Tips

Fall foliage season is upon us, so I’m going to share some tips for you to try when you head to your favorite deciduous grove to capture it in its glory. The sound of shutters will ring louder than the whistling wind that causes leaves to detach themselves from their summer homes. Landscape photographers feel their adrenalin pump and await the arrival of reds, yellows, oranges and a morning chill in the air. If you’ve read this far, capturing nature’s arboreal fireworks interests you. Read on to see what you can do to make your autumn captures as spectacular as the color you’ll encounter.

Capture that Reflection: Early morning is a prime time to make autumn images. Be at your location before the sun comes up because dawn light may produce dramatic photos, there are less people, and animals may appear. Another reason to be out at sunrise is there’s less wind, which translates to calm water. Calm water means clean reflections. Incorporate the reflection into your composition. Spin the polarizer to lighten it up. The effect is visible through the viewfinder and can be verified on the LCD. A graduated neutral-density filter can help darken the “real” part. This will bring the exposure value of the reflection and the real part close together to get an even exposure and softer contrast ratio.

Five Favorite Fall Color Tips

Details: Don’t overlook details that appear everywhere. Spend an entire session with nothing but your macro lens. Force yourself to go beyond the gorgeous tree, rolling hillside of color or iconic S curve in the river. Go close to the bank and look for small pockets of still water and capture the reflection on its surface. Find the fallen leaf that sits atop a stone and make an intimate portrait. Slow down the shutter to capture the effect of water dancing around its perimeter. Head back into the forest and look for details at your feet, at eye level and on branches. Find a lone leaf dangling from its stem that awaits its inevitable descent. Incorporate a blue-sky background or play with depth of field to create a wash of out-of-focus color. Study the forest floor to find a macro landscape. Look out at eye level for a leaf that may have gotten lodged in a section of bark. You may wind up with so many winners, you keep the macro lens on for more than one session.

Five Favorite Fall Color Tips

Use a Polarizer: Deepen the blue sky with a polarizer. Not only will it enhance its color, it removes glare from the leaves, which allows more saturated color to come through. Work at right angles to the sun so the polarizer has its maximum impact. If you feel the sun warming either of your cheeks, you’re in the right position. If the sun is in your eyes or hitting the back of your head, the polarizer will have little or no effect. Create compositions that have balance. Simply including blue sky and yellow foliage doesn’t produce a winner. If the sky lacks interesting clouds, minimize it and include just a small section of blue at the top of the frame.

Sweet Light: Regardless of the subject matter you shoot, the time of day at which it’s photographed is critical. Since photography is “All About The Light,” choosing the right time of day to make your photos determines their success. The quality of light at sunrise and sunset is unrivaled for its beauty and color. It provides a rich warm tone, it’s low on the horizon and rakes your subjects with magnificent sidelight. There’s a softness that can’t be had at any other time of day. Getting up early for sunrise may not be easy, but in the autumn it’s easier to accept, as the hour at which the sun rises is later than if you were photographing sunrise in mid-June. As if these factors weren’t enough to convince you to photograph early and late in the day, there’s also the potential for a magnificent autumn sunrise or sunset to add drama and intrigue to your photographs.

Five Favorite Fall Color Tips

Colors That Have Contrast: Colors found on opposite sides of a color wheel are great to incorporate into a composition. If you’re familiar with the color wheel, blue and yellow are opposites. Talk about an autumn match made in heaven. Crisp, clear, blue skies integrated with the fall color of yellow, and life is good. Since red and orange are in the same color family as yellow, it’s no wonder why fall foliage set against a blue sky works so well.

Visit www.russburdenphotography.com for information about his nature photography tours and safari to Tanzania.

The post Five Favorite Fall Color Tips appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.


Source: Outdoor Photography
Five Favorite Fall Color Tips

{$excerpt:n}

Photo Of The Day By Christopher Fridley

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Clear Lake, Washington” by Christopher Fridley.
Photo By Christopher Fridley

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Clear Lake, Washington” by Christopher Fridley.

“A little hideaway close to home in the foothills of Skagit County, Washington, describes Fridley.

See more of Christopher Fridley’s photography at www.christopherfridley.zenfolio.com.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

The post Photo Of The Day By Christopher Fridley appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.


Source: Outdoor Photography
Photo Of The Day By Christopher Fridley

{$excerpt:n}

Photo Of The Day By Matthew Morrissette

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Sunset Reflections of Haystack Rock” by Matthew Morrissette. Location: Cannon Beach, Oregon.
Photo By Matthew Morrissette

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Sunset Reflections of Haystack Rock” by Matthew Morrissette. Location: Cannon Beach, Oregon.

“I spent the 4th of July weekend in Cannon Beach, Oregon,” Morrissette says. “Most of my time was spent being amazed at the ever-changing light on Haystack Rock. From dawn to dusk, the light and moods varied from bright blue skies and sunny to cloudy and misty. What I hoped for most was a fiery sunset. On the third day, my hopes were fulfilled, and I was able to capture this image.”

See more of Matthew Morrissette’s photography at amorrissetteperspective.com.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

The post Photo Of The Day By Matthew Morrissette appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.


Source: Outdoor Photography
Photo Of The Day By Matthew Morrissette

{$excerpt:n}

Older posts